Across the country, cities are paying people to leave flood-prone homes, then tearing down the houses to keep the space open. But fixing one problem can create another for the people left behind.
Author: Sam Turken
Published: 2021-12-03 04:40 pm
Cities are buying people's flood-prone homes, altering neighborhoods in the process
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Across the country, cities are paying people to leave flood-prone homes, then tearing down the houses to keep the space open. But fixing one problem can create another for the people left behind.

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